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Because hunger doesn't wait for policy change.





Vital Signs, the 2018 federal budget, and the pragmatic face of equity

Two recent events were significant in shining a spotlight on poverty in Toronto: the release of the Vital Signs report, which demonstrated the growing inequities in our city, and the release of the federal budget, which showed the important role the federal government has in improving the health of our cities.

Vital Signs

The Vital Signs report, the Toronto Foundation’s annual snapshot of urban life, showed that Toronto is increasingly becoming two cities – one underserved, one not – with quality of life greatly impacted by income, race, immigration status, gender, sexual identity, and age.

Vital Signs referenced Daily Bread’s 2017 Who’s Hungry report to help illustrate this increasing inequity, highlighting how Toronto food banks saw almost 1 million visits last year, with the most sustained increase among those aged 45 and up1. This increase happened despite on-paper prosperity and low unemployment rates.

How can a robust economy and recession-era food bank demand co-exist? The answer relates to the labour market.

People who have fallen out of the labour market, such as seniors or those with a disability who cannot work, are having an increasingly difficult time keeping up with rapidly rising costs of living. The labour market itself is also becoming more fragmented and less likely to provide steady income.

And while there has been a pervasive shift in the labour market from full-time employment to more part-time and casual work, there is evidence this shift may not be impacting everyone equally. The Vital Signs report highlighted that racialized groups are more likely than non-racialized groups to be working in precarious or part-time work without benefits2.

Similarly, the Who’s Hungry survey found that recent newcomers, including many from Afghanistan, Nigeria, Iraq, and Syria, are almost twice as likely than non-recent newcomers to be receiving their main source of income from employment.

Despite earning more than the minimum wage, respondents reported only being able to get jobs with part-time hours, and having to skip meals because they are paying upwards of 74 per cent of their income on rent3. With this kind of financial pressure, skipping meals and/or accessing food banks becomes a necessity, despite living in the wealthiest city in the country.

The 2018 Federal Budget and the Canada Workers Benefit

The 2018 Federal Budget took an important step in acknowledging the increasing precariousness of the labour market by creating what the budget referred to as a more “generous” and “accessible” Working Income Tax Benefit, now rebranded as the Canada Workers Benefit.

The 2018 federal budget commits to increasing the amounts given to those who are eligible, as well as increasing eligibility by expanding the income range so more low income workers can access it.

For instance, a single parent or couple earning $25,000 a year could receive as much as $717 more from the program in 2019 than in 2018. And those earning $30,000 per year are now eligible to receive the benefit, whereas in 2018 they would have not been eligible. A single, unattached person could receive up to $500 more from the program, and singles earning $20,000 a year are now eligible. This is an important step towards greater income security and we are pleased to see it come to fruition.

In 2007 Daily Bread had praised the introduction of the Working Income Tax Benefit, but we also pushed for a more generous benefit that would provide more money and raising the “phase-out” points so more working poor could access it. This is particularly important for income security for many working poor, including food bank clients, who receive more than the minimum wage but are restricted in the number of hours they get at work.

Automatic enrolment in the Canada Workers Benefit – just as important in the increase in benefits itself

The federal budget also commits to increasing access to the benefit by enabling the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to automatically determine eligibility, instead of a potential recipient having to apply separately and potentially miss out on receiving the benefit. All too often we see food bank clients, seniors in particular, who are not accessing their benefits because of a lack of awareness, no access to internet, or not being able to read the forms due to language barriers. Moving to automatic enrolment is just as important a step as the increase in benefits itself, which the government estimates will enable 300,000 additional low-income workers to access it.

But it is worth highlighting again that what appears to be simply an administrative change (automatic enrolment in the CWB) can have a potentially large impact on improving the lives of people living on low income, particularly groups such as recent newcomers, those who don’t speak English as a first language, and other vulnerable populations who are more likely to encounter administrative barriers when trying to access government services. This is what we are calling the pragmatic face of equity.

Other measures in the federal budget, such as investments in affordable housing, and indexing child and seniors benefits to inflation underscore the federal government’s crucial role in income support – indeed, what is becoming more evident is that all three levels of government have a role to play in helping to create more equitable and just cities.

1 Toronto Vital Signs 2017-2018, pg. 35.
2 Vital Signs Report 2017-2018, pg.71.
3 2017 Who’s Hungry, pg.29.

Date Added: March 12, 2018 | Filed under: Blog, News, Research — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 12:05 pm

Ontario Budget 2018: An opportunity to set “The Roadmap for Change” off to a strong start

In November 2017, the provincial government released “Income Security: A Roadmap for Change”, written by three groups that were appointed by the Minister of Community and Social Services (MCSS) in 2016 to give advice on how to reform Ontario’s income security system.

The Roadmap made some important recommendations, including significantly increasing social assistance rates, making the system less punitive, and implementing an Ontario Housing Benefit.

The 2018 Ontario Budget provides an opportunity to immediately invest in two recommendations proposed by the Roadmap:

  1. Implement a Standard Flat Rate, collapsing the Basic Needs Allowance and Shelter Allowance portions of social assistance into one amount;
  2. Setting this Standard Flat Rate to $794 per month for Ontario Works and $1,209 for Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP).

While greater investments will still need to be made to bring people out of poverty, these will be crucial steps that have the power to transform the system and can have an impact on people struggling with hunger in Toronto.

The Standard Flat Rate

In Daily Bread’s 2016 Who’s Hungry report we profiled Tim, a food bank client and volunteer who had lost his job after 30 years and was homeless. Tim’s health was deteriorating, and his condition was exacerbated from having to sleep outdoors. Because he couldn’t work and had no other income options he was able to access Ontario Works but was in a catch-22: because he was homeless, he was not entitled to receive the Shelter Allowance, only the Basic Needs Allowance – a little over $300 a month. Because of this bureaucratic separation between the Basic Needs and Shelter portions of Ontario Works, Tim was receiving only half of an already low level of income support, creating another barrier to his escaping homelessness.

Tim’s situation reveals one of many structural flaws of the present social assistance system, but the 2018 Ontario Budget presents an opportunity to correct this flaw: implementing a Standard Flat Rate, which would collapse the Basic Needs and Shelter allowances into one amount. This change would ensure that everyone receiving social assistance would have the same level of support, regardless of whether they are homeless, renting or owning, or live in rent-geared-to-income housing.

This change would also help accommodate various living arrangements people have to make in today’s challenging rental market in order to maintain housing, such as sharing accommodation with others. The present system is designed to monitor and regulate people’s living situation by basing rates on shelter costs, and where and with whom you live. This creates further hardship and barriers to those receiving assistance, as well as adding to the administrative burden of the system and the front line workers trying to help individuals in need.

Increasing social assistance rates and developing a Minimum Income Standard

We know that the main driver of the need for food banks in Toronto is lack of income: this is in large part due to the extremely low levels of income provided by provincial social assistance.

The majority of clients accessing food banks in Toronto receive one of two provincial social assistance programs as their main source of income. According to Daily Bread’s most recent Who’s Hungry survey, 64% rely on either Ontario Works or ODSP as their main source of income.

As the labour market continues its shift from full-time employment to part-time employment, greater numbers of people out of work are forced to rely on provincial social assistance, and those with a disability are less likely to be able to access employer-triggered disability income programs.

Despite being a crucial source of income support for almost a million Ontarians, the levels of income have fallen so far behind inflation there would need to be a 41% increase in OW payments, and a 23% increase in ODSP payments, for them to be equivalent to what they were worth in 1993.

In order to address this crucial gap in income adequacy, the Roadmap proposes that rates be immediately increased by 10% for a single person receiving Ontario Works and 5% increase for those on ODSP. This increase would bring amounts to $794 and $1,209 respectively.

While the working group chose an amount that the government could realistically implement, it was recommended that the government move as quickly as possible to move those in deepest poverty towards an adequate level of income that more accurately reflects actual living costs.

While the Roadmap proposes this initially be done through direct increases to social assistance rates, the report states that the goal should be to bring every household in the province to a “Minimum Income Standard” through a combination of social assistance and other income supports by 2027-2028.

The defined Minimum Income Standard would initially be set at the same level as the official Low-Income Measure used by the province’s Poverty Reduction Strategy (LIM-50) plus an additional 30% added for persons with a disability.

To reach this minimum standard would require supports that go beyond increases to provincial social assistance rates, and be part of a “building block” approach that combines municipal, provincial and federal cash benefits as well as housing supports and core health benefits (such as prescription drug coverage). This could also include a portable housing benefit, proposed by the Roadmap as a universal, income-tested benefit to provide direct financial assistance to help with high rental costs.

The Roadmap for Change provides achievable targets and tactics that will effect real change in the lives of people struggling with hunger and poverty in Ontario.

The Ontario Budget 2018 is a chance to take a solid step in the right direction and reach those targets.

Let’s get moving.

Date Added: February 8, 2018 | Filed under: Blog, Government, Information, News, Research — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 10:34 am

Inclusionary Zoning

Daily Bread Food Bank submitted our feedback (below) about proposed inclusionary zoning legislation. Today is the deadline for public feedback. Send your responses today to

To the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs regarding EBR Registry posting number 013-1977:

Daily Bread Food Bank is a non-profit organization that provides food and support to almost 200 food programs and 136 member agencies across Toronto. We welcome the opportunity to comment on the proposed regulations under the Planning Act related to inclusionary zoning, posted on the Environmental Registry.

The legislation introduced in 2016 that would permit municipalities to enact Inclusionary Zoning by-laws was a promising development that would potentially enable cities like Toronto to have another policy tool at their disposal to help address our current crisis of housing affordability.

Unfortunately, the current regulations as proposed are unlikely to help create more affordable rental housing, and the needs of low income households – the group buckling the most under the pressure of shelter costs – are not addressed.

Last year alone there were over 990,000 visits to Daily Bread’s member agencies and to North York Harvest food banks. Food banks in the former inner suburbs are bursting at the seams, seeing a nearly 70 per cent increase in client demand since 2008 – an increase that can be directly attributed to skyrocketing rents. As Daily Bread’s research shows, those accessing food banks spend on average 70 per cent of their income on rent, and many report skipping meals to afford TTC fare in order to get to jobs or doctors’ appointments.

We urge the province to adjust these regulations so that they enable the development of more rental properties in order to help address the housing crisis in our city. It is not an unreasonable goal that people – regardless of their level of income – should be able to afford to rent a decent home near to where they work, go to school, and access essential goods and services.

We also urge the province to enable municipalities to have the flexibility to designate the maximum level of affordable units (maximum caps) depending on need of various communities, in addition to setting minimum caps so as to adequately disperse the supply across the province.

When it comes to increasing the availability of affordable housing, there is no silver bullet. Indeed, properly crafted Inclusionary Zoning needs to be an essential part of a range of policy tools that can help address the escalating housing crisis in the City of Toronto.

Making the aforementioned adjustments can further demonstrate the Province’s commitment to improving not only the lives of the most vulnerable but also the growing number of middle-income earners who are being squeezed out of both the rental and home ownership markets in Toronto.

Done right, Inclusionary Zoning will help ensure cities like Toronto remain resilient, accessible, and inclusive for everyone regardless of income.

Date Added: February 1, 2018 | Filed under: Blog, Government, News — Tags: , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 11:13 am

Report Released: A Roadmap for Change – input needed before January 2, 2018

A new report called “Income Security: A Roadmap for Change” has just been released by the provincial government.

The Roadmap was written by three groups that were appointed by the Minister of Community and Social Services (MCSS) in 2016 to give advice to the government on how to reform Ontario’s income security system.

Former Daily Bread board member John Stapleton was a member of the Income Security Reform Working Group, one of the three groups that contributed to the report.

We urge everyone to read the Roadmap, engage with its recommendations, and participate in the public consultation process. Public consultation will take place between now and January 2, 2018.

The Roadmap is available here:

The government’s press release is here:

The government is asking people to provide feedback in writing. Information about the feedback process is here:

The Roadmap makes some important recommendations, including large increases to social assistance rates, making the system less punitive, and the implementation of an Ontario Housing Benefit.

This is an important opportunity to push government to action, and make real change that can have an impact on people struggling with hunger in Toronto.

Date Added: November 17, 2017 | Filed under: Blog, Government, News, Research — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 8:08 am

Portable Housing Benefit

Daily Bread joins the call for a National Portable Housing Benefit program in the National Housing Strategy

Daily Bread has joined the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness (CAEH), United Way Centraide Canada, Raising the Roof , Campaign 2000 and other leading Canadian anti-poverty organizations to call on the federal government to include a National Portable Housing Benefit in the upcoming National Housing Strategy.

In a letter sent to the Hon. Jean Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, the group called on the federal government to work with the provinces and territories to launch a national portable housing benefit that starts by assisting those with greatest need, particularly households currently spending more than 50% of on housing and Canadians experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

Rent is the single biggest expense for those accessing food banks in Toronto: food bank clients spend, on average, 71% of their income on rent. Direct assistance for renters would help households most in need, complement social housing, and provide a flexible benefit that renters can use regardless of where they live — all without adding pressure to the already-heated rental market that exists in cities like Toronto. Rental assistance is also an essential element to any effort to prevent and end homelessness.

Read the full text of the letter to Minister Duclos.

What could a National Portable Housing Benefit look like?

Daily Bread has been working closely with a number of national partner organizations in the National Housing Collaborative on a proposal to the federal government of what a National Portable Housing Benefit could encompass. In a detailed proposal recently submitted to the federal government, the NHC proposed a single, harmonized and co-funded federal-provincial-territorial program that provides rent assistance directly to tenants in need.

It’s important to note that our housing benefit proposal is designed to be complementary to, not a replacement for, affordable and social housing investment. Canada has a severe affordable housing crisis which requires both construction of new housing and a means to immediately address the urgent housing affordability needs of Canadians.

Read the full National Housing Collaborative, National Portable Housing Benefit proposal.

Date Added: September 12, 2017 | Filed under: Blog, Government, In the News, Information, News, Research — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 3:40 pm

20 Years of Impact

This year, Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Daily Bread are marking 20 years of working together to help Torontonians in need.

“Life circumstances can change without warning, and what Daily Bread does is vital to help people move from tough times into a better future,” says Gaylen Duncan, Country Operating Officer for Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

Thanks to Bank of America for their dedication, passion and generous support – and for two decades of better futures!

To read the latest issue of our Food for Thought newsletter please click here.

Date Added: September 7, 2017 | Filed under: Blog, News — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 9:53 am

It’s tax time: are people on low incomes getting all the benefits they’re entitled to?

For thousands accessing food banks across Toronto, lack of income is the key driver of hunger. Clients on average spend 71 per cent of their income on rent, which leaves little for food and other necessities. For many, an extra hundred dollars or more a month could mean the difference between being able to afford groceries or having to access a food bank, being able to pay rent without skipping meals, or not needing to access a food bank as frequently.

While much needs to be done to improve and strengthen our social safety net and income security system, there is extra income that is already available through our tax system, but receiving these benefits is dependent on people filing their taxes.

Food banks can help remove barriers to accessing extra income

Sometimes people don’t file their taxes because they are not aware of the benefits to them, or may encounter other barriers due to the complexity and administrative requirements involved. Unfortunately, people on low incomes are losing out on potentially thousands of dollars of additional income because of these barriers.

Recognizing the barriers many low income people face in getting the benefits from tax filing, some food banks and other member agencies of Daily Bread Food Bank provide tax clinics and other tax filing assistance for their clients. With targeted outreach and administrative and technological support, many more low income people could be receiving all the benefits they’re entitled to receive.

Daily Bread Food Bank member agencies such as The Bluffs, New Toronto Street Food Bank, St. James Food Basket, Toronto West SDA, and Native Canadian Centre among many others offer tax filing assistance. These member agencies are similar to many other community tax clinics that provide trained volunteers, many through the Canada Revenue Agency’s Community Volunteer Income Tax Program (CVITP), which help people file their taxes through one on one support. Through continued outreach such as this, hopefully more people who are less likely to file taxes will be able to do so, and be informed of all the benefits to which they’re entitled.

Who’s filing – and who’s not filing – by the numbers

In 2013 Daily Bread’s Who’s Hungry survey found that 72 per cent of respondents accessing food banks across the GTA had filed their income taxes that year.1 While it is good news that nearly three quarters of respondents filed their taxes and are getting the benefits they are entitled to, there are more than 25 per cent of clients who are potentially missing out. And despite outreach efforts to inform people of these benefits, newer strategies may be needed to reach those who are less likely to file.

The Maytree Foundation recently published a piece entitled “Filing taxes brings major benefits to people on low incomes”. The article, which will be referenced throughout this report, noted that while provincial and federal tax benefits such as the Canada Child Benefit, Old Age Security, and GST/HST credits can cumulatively add up to thousands of dollars of additional income for low income households, many miss out because they either don’t file or are not aware of what they’re eligible to apply for or even how to apply.

Of those who do not file, the Who’s Hungry survey found that certain demographic groups accessing food banks were less likely to file than others.2 They include single people, households receiving social assistance as a main form of income, and recent newcomers who have been in Canada for more than a year but less than four years. These groups are not mutually exclusive, and many issues they face overlap. Highlighting those groups who are less likely to file may help to provide some insight as to what some potential barriers to filing might be and where more outreach may be needed.

Single person households

Single Person Household Bar Chart

Single person households are significantly less likely to have filed their taxes, with 69 per cent filing a tax return the previous year compared to 75 per cent for other household types.

Of all household types, working age single person households without children have the least amount of pre-retirement tax credits available to them, unlike households with children who can access various child tax benefits, including the Ontario Child Benefit and the Canada Child Tax Benefit. For single people living on low income, there may be less incentive to file taxes due to lack of awareness of the benefits that are available to them even if they had no employment income the previous year.

Social assistance as a main source of income

Bar 2

People receiving social assistance as their main form of income are also significantly less likely to have filed their taxes the previous year, with 70 per cent reporting that they filed compared with 78 per cent not receiving social assistance as their main form of income. Respondents who were not receiving social assistance as their main form of income were receiving other sources such as employment, pensions, or child tax benefits.

In addition to the misperception that if they don’t owe income tax there is little reason to file, people receiving social assistance may face other barriers. In Maytree’s article, it was noted that since the CRA is promoting electronic filing the lack of accessibility for people with disabilities or those who don’t have high-speed internet or a computer, may pose barriers. Clients living on social assistance spend the vast majority of their income on rent and utilities, and some may not be able to afford to have high speed internet at home.

The article also noted that “people with low incomes experiencing challenges or who have complex tax situations may need hands-on help to tax file, but can’t afford paid tax advisors and may not know where to turn for free help it it’s available in their community.”

Recent newcomers

Bar 3

Recent newcomers, for the purposes of this analysis defined as being in Canada for four years or less (but here for more than one year), are less likely to have filed their taxes. Fifty-seven per cent of recent newcomers filed their taxes the previous year, versus 76 per cent of those who are not recent newcomers.

The barriers faced by recent newcomers are similar to those faced by others, including lack of awareness of available benefits, cost, and lack of knowledge of the system that affect their ability to access a range of services beyond just financial ones. Limited knowledge of English could be another reason, with a previous study by Daily Bread noting that those who did not have a good command of the language were less likely to file.

Despite being more likely to file their taxes, low income seniors are still not receiving all the benefits they’re entitled to

Bar 4

According to the 2013 Who’s Hungry survey, respondents who were seniors 65 or older were significantly more likely to have filed their taxes: 85 per cent filed the previous year compared to 71 per cent who were not seniors. However, only 11 per cent were receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement for seniors, even though many more were likely eligible. The most recent Who’s Hungry survey for 2016 did not ask a question about tax filing, but the number of seniors accessing the GIS had not significantly changed.

The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) is part of a basic income-type program that exists for seniors in Canada. Low income seniors qualify for the GIS if they are receiving the Old Age Security pension (OAS), and have an annual income lower than a set threshold ($17,544 annually for a single person household, or approximately $1,500 per month). They also need to have resided in Canada for at least 10 years in order to receive it.

The Maytree report referenced an evaluation by Human Resources and Development Canada, which estimated that while 87 per cent of eligible seniors are accessing the GIS, there are potentially 200,000 more who may be missing out.

Food bank clients who are seniors provide some insight as to the circumstances of those who are not receiving the benefit.


The median monthly income reported by Who’s Hungry survey respondents 65 and over is $1,200 per month, which from a financial standpoint make them eligible for the GIS. While three quarters of survey respondents were not born in Canada, the vast majority – 74 per cent – have lived here at least 10 years or more which would make also them eligible due to their length of residence in Canada.

In order to receive the GIS, a senior must specifically request it when applying for OAS. While a much higher percentage of senior respondents (50%) reported that they were receiving OAS, it’s still possible that some are not applying for that source of income as well even though they’re entitled to it.

Because the application process for both OAS and GIS can be administratively complex without some assistance, language barriers may be a factor for some seniors in Toronto not accessing it. Fifty-one per cent of seniors reported not speaking English as their main language at home. Other seniors who have just turned 65 may not have applied in time, and are still receiving social assistance (either Ontario Works or Ontario Disability Support Program) despite being qualified to receive seniors’ benefits that could increase their income by hundreds of dollars a month.

“Tax-filing is a proven way to improve the financial situation of Canadians with low incomes, but has yet to be fully exploited as a means to reduce poverty in Canada.”

– U. Bajwa

Further reading

Accessing Income-Boosting Benefits Through Tax Filing – U. Bajwa for Prosper Canada

Filing Your First Tax Return in Canada: Free Resources For Newcomers – Toronto Public Library

As a doctor, here’s why I’m prescribing tax returns. Seriously. – Gary Bloch, Globe and Mail

1 The results from the 2013 Who’s Hungry survey are based on 1680 interviews conducted with people accessing food banks across the GTA.

2 Chi square analyses were conducted for the results in this report, with significance at the .05 level.

Date Added: March 31, 2017 | Filed under: Blog, Information, News, Research — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 2:07 pm

Top Five Team’s Needed for Daily Bread’s Food Sort Challenge

Daily Bread’s Food Sort Challenge is on November 16th and we’re looking for the best teams to compete. People struggling with hunger across Toronto are relying on you to sort 4,000 lbs of food as fast as possible. There are only a few spots left and Daily Bread needs your help.

Here are the top five teams Daily Bread needs to compete in the Food Sort Challenge:

1) Team Speedy
If you blink, you may miss it – a speedy team will finish the Food Sort Challenge before you know it. Teams will compete to sort the quickest in less than two hours. Keep an eye out, because if you don’t move fast enough, Team Speedy will snatch first place.

2) Team Energy
Your hands may be quick but do you have the endurance? A team with energy will keep their spirits high and their body moving when they are tired. This team can outlast others, making them a formidable opponent.

3) Team Winners
If you think like a winner you are a winner. It’s always important for teams to come in with the right mindset. Believing in yourself will help push your team forward and win the Food Sort Challenge.

4) Team Strategy
Strategic food sorters have the potential to outsmart other teams. Make sure you have a sharp mind because the Food Sort Challenge is more than which team is the fastest. Team strategy will discover the most efficient way to sort food – whether an assembly line or great teamwork.

5) Team Cheaters (just kidding)
All Food Sort Challenge teams are expected to compete fairly, and most importantly, have fun! The Food Sort Challenge and any donations raised will help support 142 member agencies and 200 meal programs across Toronto. Registration fee is $1100 per team. We are also asking all teams to fundraise for an opportunity to get closer to the title. Register now and secure your team before it’s too late!

Does your team have what it takes to come out on top?

Don’t wait – there are limited spots! We are also asking all teams to fundraise for an opportunity to get closer to the title. Register now and secure your team before it’s too late!

Click here to register!

For more information, please contact Dayana at

Date Added: October 24, 2016 | Filed under: Blog, Fundraising Events, News — Tags: , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 1:16 pm

Volunteer for Daily Bread!

Make an impact and help fight hunger in your community!

Daily Bread is currently offering volunteer positions throughout our organization. We are looking for receptionists as well as Fundraising Donor Clerks. Each of these positions play a very large role in our operation and help us continue to fight hunger all year round.


Receptionists serve as Daily Bread ambassadors and as an important resource for food bank clients. The Receptionist volunteers in a fast-paced environment to provide front-line support to the daily operations of Daily Bread Food Bank. This position serves visitors by greeting, welcoming and directing them appropriately, notifies staff of visitor arrivals and helps to maintain security and telecommunications systems. To read more about the job description and how to apply please click the button below.

Click here for more information

Fundraising Donor Clerk

As an integral part of the Fundraising and Development team, the Fundraising Donor Clerk will be responsible for the accurate entry of data in a high-paced environment to update donor records, and will provide customer service for donors. To read more about the job description and how to apply please click the button below.

Click here for more information

If you have any questions or for more information please click here to contact our Volunteer Coordinator, Individuals & Corporate Groups, Jeff Wong.

Date Added: September 8, 2016 | Filed under: Blog, News, Volunteer, Volunteer Opportunities — Tags: , , , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 11:36 am

Sign up for the Holiday Drive Public Food Sorts today!

UPDATE December 15 10:21 a.m.: The Holiday Drive Public Food Sorts are full.

Don’t worry – if you weren’t able to register for a spot but you were really hoping to help Daily Bread Food Bank, there are many other ways to support Daily Bread and the Holiday Drive!

1. Donate! Drop off non-perishable food donations to your local fire hall. Make a gift online. Help us reach our goals of $2.5 million and 1 million pounds of food by December 31.

2. Run a food drive or event! It’s easy, and we can help. Run a food drive at your school or in your workplace. Having a holiday party? Why not ask guests to bring a non-perishable food donation instead of a gift?

3. Volunteer throughout the year. While we need people to help sort through the Holiday Drive food donations, we also need volunteers throughout the year. It doesn’t stop just because the holidays are over! Consider volunteering during March Break. Taking a stay-cation with the family this summer? Why not sign up to volunteer?


Starting at 10 a.m. this morning, registration for the Holiday Drive Public Food Sorts will open up online here: Holiday Drive Public Food Sorts

This year’s Holiday Drive Public Food Sorts will be held on Christmas Eve morning, as well as Monday, December 28 and Tuesday, December 29. For more information on shifts and how to register, please click here.

Can’t make it? The Holiday Drive is already underway! You can donate non-perishable food and drop it off at any fire hall across Toronto, or directly to Daily Bread’s warehouse at 191 New Toronto Street.

To make a monetary donation please click here.

Date Added: December 14, 2015 | Filed under: Blog, Holiday Drive, News — Tags: , , , , — Adam Paralovos @ 11:04 am